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CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

Dealing with anti-social behaviour

Dealing with anti-social behaviour

Leicestershire County Council is committed to doing all it can to help prevent the problems caused by anti-social behaviour.

If you feel you are the victim of ASB there are several courses of action you are able to take. 

Firstly, speak to the person who is causing you a nuisance. Could the issue be resolved with a simple conversation? Stay calm and be tolerant of their point of view. 

If this doesn’t work, keep a simple diary of instances where they have caused you a problem. This will be helpful for any future investigations. 

Find someone to talk to about caring

Find someone to talk to about caring

If you have identified yourself as a carer, we know that you may not have much spare time. There are a number of organisations that can help you find the information, advice, support and activities, you need as a carer. 

Support for Carers in Leicestershire

Support for carers 

Whether you care full time or just a few hours a week, we provide info and advice service for carers in Leicestershire through Support for Carers. Their services include:

Living with dementia

Living with dementia

Finding out if you have dementia

Memory is often the first thing that people notice. If you’re worried that your memory is getting worse, or is beginning to affect everyday life, talk to your GP.

Not all memory problems are related to dementia but your GP will decide with you what tests and support will be helpful to you.

Memory assessment and dementia services

If your GP is concerned that you may have dementia, they will refer you to the specialist memory service for a more detailed assessment, diagnosis and to discuss any possible treatment. 

If you think someone is being deprived of their liberty

If you think someone is being deprived of their liberty

  • Deprivation of liberty safeguards apply to individuals who are assessed as lacking mental capacity in relation to where they live and their care and treatment arrangements.

If someone ‘lacks mental capacity’ it means they can’t make a decision for themselves at the time it needs to be made. Someone may lack mental capacity because, for example, they have:

What is a carer's assessment?

What is a carer's assessment?

A carer’s assessment will look at your existing support network, for example, family or friends. It considers the things that you want or need to achieve outside of your caring role and the impact this has on your ability to carry out those activities and how this affects your wellbeing.

Lifelines, telecare and alarms

Lifelines, telecare and alarms

Alarms and telecare

For information about the different types of alarms on offer and how telecare systems work, visit the NHS website

Lifelines (community alarms)

A lifeline - also known as a community alarm - is an emergency response system to enable you to live independently, knowing that help is at hand if you need it. The alarm is connected to a 24 hour monitoring centre which will charge you a monthly subscription fee.

Planning for emergencies

Planning for emergencies

If you’re looking after an adult and they have to go into hospital, you may not be able to stay at home.

You won’t be able to stay at home if both of these apply:

  • you’re under 16 years old
  • the person you look after is the only adult who lives in your home

Even if you’re over 16, any younger brothers or sisters may not be able to stay at home with you.

Talk to your family about what will happen if the person you care for has to go into hospital. Ask them to make a plan for where you’ll stay and how you’ll be looked after.

Talking to doctors and nurses if you're a young carer

Talking to doctors and nurses if you're a young carer

Sometimes doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers are worried about telling you what is happening with your parent because you’re a child.

Speak to your worker about about a Young Carer's ID Card which you can show to doctors, nurses or healthcare staff.

The adult you look after or another adult in your family has to apply for the card on your behalf.

If you have a Young Carer ID card, doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers will be able to tell you about:

Someone to talk to and activities

Someone to talk to and activities

There are many other young people who look after someone in their family. There are telephone helplines, online forums where you can find someone to talk to. And there are groups you can go to, to get a break from home.

Someone to talk to

There are people you can talk to, ask questions of or share your experience with including:

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