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Greener future for trees

Plans to develop precious stock for future generations

National Tree Week logo
County councillors are this week set to support a tree management strategy which will see more trees planted and a greater emphasis on recognising their importance in promoting Leicestershire as an attractive place to live and work.

 

The strategy, which will be discussed by Cabinet on Friday (22nd November), sets out plans to ensure the long-term conservation, sustainability and development of the precious tree stock for the people of the county and future generations.

 


We’re proud to be a green council and we’re committed to tackling climate change and laying down the roots to protect local wildlife habitats.

 “Trees are an essential resource which provide a wide range of environmental, economic and social benefits, and our focus is to continue to build upon our ever-growing green infrastructure and ensure a tree-filled future for Leicestershire

The discussions on the strategy will take place during National Tree Week, the UK's largest annual tree celebration which marks the start of the winter planting season.

Byron Rhodes, deputy leader of the county council, said: “National Tree Week is an opportunity for us to raise awareness of the important role trees play in our communities, and a reminder that now is the best time to plant a tree.”

The county council has planned a number of events to mark the week, starting with a tree-planting ceremony at County Hall on Friday, 22nd November.

 

Other activities include:

Wednesday, 27th November -  The county council has once again teamed up with the Woodland Trust to hand out packs of trees to local landowners and farmers at Beaumanor Hall near Loughborough;

Thursday, 28th November  - An assortment of flowering trees will be planted at Market Bosworth Country Park as part of a longer-term project to develop the arboretum;

 Friday, 29th November -  The week will be rounded off with an educational forestry school session at Woodstone Community Primary School, Ravenstone;

 

The report also acknowledges that the council is continuing to look at the implications of, and put plans in place, for ash dieback, which is likely to affect the majority of the 500,000 or so ash trees in the county over a period of five to 15 years.

The tree management strategy will be discussed at Cabinet at 2pm on Friday, November 22nd, the meeting will be shown live, via www:leicestershire.gov.uk/webcast 

 

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