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Check out choosing the best place to live for all the options available to you, if you feel you need more support to live at home.

What is supported living?  

Supported living is: 

  • about having your own place to live, with the support you need.
  • being independent with your own front door key.
  • being able to live on your own or with friends
  • choosing to rent a home or own your own home 
  • choosing where you live and who supports you 

Supported living enables you to live an ordinary life and contribute to your community.

There are 2 parts to supported living:

  1. Help to find the most suitable home, whether it’s on your own or you share with other people. 
  2. The support you need to do the things you want to do and to live independently.

The support you get builds on the things you can do and depends on what other support you have from your friends, family and the community.

Who is it for? 

Supported living might be suitable for you if you’re an adult aged 18 or over, with eligible care and support needs and have:

  • a physical disability or
  • a learning disability or
  • autism or
  • mental health problems

Watch this 'Your place to live' video for stories about people who have moved into supported living. (The only scheme that isn't available in Leicestershire is where you have a volunteer living with you rent free.)  The video lasts for 22 minutes.

What does it cost? 

Supported living costs vary as it depends on how much it costs for your home and the amount of support you need.

How do I apply for supported living?

You’ll need to ask us for a care and support assessment first to see if you have eligible care and support needs.  

A social care worker will visit you to do the assessment and will talk to you about all your options and agree if supported living is the best way to meet your care and support needs. If it is, we can support you to move into supported living.

You can ask for a care and support assessment yourself or you can ask someone to do it for you such as:

  • your allocated social care worker if you have one
  • your family, friend or the person who looks after you
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